Can I Play This Video Game?

What it Truly Takes to Play Video Games on PC

Steve Smith answers the most commonly asked question on his Facebook Page, can your computer play that specific video game?

Episode #7-11 released on November 12, 2016

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I've talked about whether you need a dedicated graphics card or not, SLI and Crossfire issues, and even what causes screen tearing. Today, I talk about the importance of minimum and recommended specifications, and how that affects your game play. Since, this is something I am asked more often than some believe, I will help you all out with an episode dedicated to just that.

If you are a gamer, you may be interested in playing the next new game title. If you're a PC Gamer, you are, also, interested in knowing if your computer can handle the game, or it is time to put money into a new graphics card. If you have a new computer, and you have an integrated graphics processor, like an APU, you may, also, be wondering if you can play games, as well, or need a graphics card.

This is something that an avid gamer like myself takes for granted. When a new game comes out, we head over to the store page, and we check what the game developer, or publisher, indicates is the minimum recommended, or recommended computer specifications. Various parts in there are more important than others, but the way they interact can have a dramatic change on your experience of the game. I will separate the possibilities from low end to high end, which will give you three scenarios to think about.

Let's start with a theoretical computer build, that we can build upon. Something that is close to being supported by all games. A quad core processor, 8 gigabytes of ram, a hard drive, and for the first case, onboard graphics. When you look at the minimum specifications of a Triple AAA title, which is the most commonly asked type of game specification request I get from you all. I look at those specifications I must stop. If you wish to play older games, many onboard graphics might be able to. But a portion of the RAM, and Processor cycles becomes dedicated to that game. This makes it harder for newer games to run. In those cases, I often suggest to purchase a dedicated graphics card, that meets or surpasses the minimum requirements, because that is all that is missing from your computer. Also, because in most places, you can also return the graphics card for a refund, if you find no change, as well.

Now, if you have the same build, but you already have a dedicated graphics card, but it is getting old in age, I often suggest to order the game over Steam. Why? Because you can buy the game, and see if the game works in your computer. While, the developer may suggest a better graphics card for the minimum specifications, it is usually meant as a way of saying this is what we can guarantee to have an enjoyable and playable experience. Do not get them wrong, it is a good idea to respect the minimum specifications, but if you have the cash, but want to see if you must spend it right away, that is a way of doing it. And, if you do not have the cash, then at least you can get a refund and you lost nothing but an hour or less of time seeing the game. Need to say, you get to test the game and see if you enjoy the experience.

Now, if you have a more modern computer, you probably tend to stick with the trends. Your issue might only be curiosity, and in the end, your blight may be the same as the latter. Again, purchase the game through Steam, or wherever it is available, and if you like the game, play on. If the game sucks, or for some reason is unplayable, get a refund. But, keep in mind, that even newer computers can be outclassed by games as the need for graphics card based VRAM increases. The more textures, the higher the image quality, etc. the more VRAM is required. And, therefore some games work on APUs, some games will work in older graphics cards, and some games enjoy newer graphics cards technologies and higher VRAM availability. Ultimately, it is your budget. This is what I had to say on this matter.

I've talked about whether you need a dedicated graphics card or not, SLI and Crossfire issues, and even what causes screen tearing. Today, I talk about the importance of minimum and recommended specifications, and how that affects your game play. Since, this is something I am asked more often than some believe, I will help you all out with an episode dedicated to just that.

If you are a gamer, you may be interested in playing the next new game title. If you're a PC Gamer, you are, also, interested in knowing if your computer can handle the game, or it is time to put money into a new graphics card. If you have a new computer, and you have an integrated graphics processor, like an APU, you may, also, be wondering if you can play games, as well, or need a graphics card.

This is something that an avid gamer like myself takes for granted. When a new game comes out, we head over to the store page, and we check what the game developer, or publisher, indicates is the minimum recommended, or recommended computer specifications. Various parts in there are more important than others, but the way they interact can have a dramatic change on your experience of the game. I will separate the possibilities from low end to high end, which will give you three scenarios to think about.

Let's start with a theoretical computer build, that we can build upon. Something that is close to being supported by all games. A quad core processor, 8 gigabytes of ram, a hard drive, and for the first case, onboard graphics. When you look at the minimum specifications of a Triple AAA title, which is the most commonly asked type of game specification request I get from you all. I look at those specifications I must stop. If you wish to play older games, many onboard graphics might be able to. But a portion of the RAM, and Processor cycles becomes dedicated to that game. This makes it harder for newer games to run. In those cases, I often suggest to purchase a dedicated graphics card, that meets or surpasses the minimum requirements, because that is all that is missing from your computer. Also, because in most places, you can also return the graphics card for a refund, if you find no change, as well.

Now, if you have the same build, but you already have a dedicated graphics card, but it is getting old in age, I often suggest to order the game over Steam. Why? Because you can buy the game, and see if the game works in your computer. While, the developer may suggest a better graphics card for the minimum specifications, it is usually meant as a way of saying this is what we can guarantee to have an enjoyable and playable experience. Do not get them wrong, it is a good idea to respect the minimum specifications, but if you have the cash, but want to see if you must spend it right away, that is a way of doing it. And, if you do not have the cash, then at least you can get a refund and you lost nothing but an hour or less of time seeing the game. Need to say, you get to test the game and see if you enjoy the experience.

Now, if you have a more modern computer, you probably tend to stick with the trends. Your issue might only be curiosity, and in the end, your blight may be the same as the latter. Again, purchase the game through Steam, or wherever it is available, and if you like the game, play on. If the game sucks, or for some reason is unplayable, get a refund. But, keep in mind, that even newer computers can be outclassed by games as the need for graphics card based VRAM increases. The more textures, the higher the image quality, etc. the more VRAM is required. And, therefore some games work on APUs, some games will work in older graphics cards, and some games enjoy newer graphics cards technologies and higher VRAM availability. Ultimately, it is your budget. This is what I had to say on this matter.

Host : Steve Smith | Music : | Editor : Steve Smith | Producer : Zed Axis Dot Net

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